If you're planning a visit to Colombia this Christmas, consider some of the traditional foods and dishes they serve during this festive season. From lechona (full-roasted pig), to ajiaco (chicken and potato soup), Colombians have the largest Christmas

If you’re planning a visit to Colombia this Christmas, consider some of the traditional foods and dishes they serve during this festive season. From lechona (full-roasted pig), to ajiaco (chicken and potato soup), Colombians have the largest Christmas dinner of the year. Other staples include potato salad, boiled potatoes, rice, and bunuelos, a traditional Colombian snack.

Pasteles

One of the most traditional foods during the Christmas season in Colombia is pasteles, which are wrapped in banana leaf and fried. To make these delicious treats, prepare a large sheet of parchment paper and a banana leaf. Heat the leaf over a flame until it is pliable, then place a large scoop of meat mixture on the banana leaf. Fold the parchment paper over the meat mixture and tie it with a string. If you prefer steamed and boiled pastels, you can skip the string altogether and use aluminum foil instead. If you’re cooking them in a steamer or a frying pan, you can even freeze them for later use.

Natilla

The most popular Colombian holiday food is natilla. A milky custard, natilla is a delicious dessert and a staple of Christmas celebrations. It’s so popular that even the president of Colombia eats it at a table in the Palacio Narino. The Colombians also buy natilla from Xmas kiosks and eat it on the go on the streets.

Arroz con leche

Colombians celebrate Christmas with a festive dinner of tamal, ajiaco, fried cheeseballs and Arroz con leche, a sweet rice pudding with cinnamon, raisins and other traditional ingredients. Although not a traditional Christmas dish, Arroz con leche is one of the most popular dishes served during the holidays. In addition to tamal, Colombians also drink the national drink, aguardiente.

Obleas

The first thing that you must know about obleas is that they are a type of cake that originated in ancient Greece and were later brought to Colombia by European Christians. Originating in ancient Greece, obleas were baked on hot iron plates, and were first served as street food in Bogota. They became popular in the late 1940s and spread throughout the region as Christianity expanded. Nowadays, the obleas are popular in both Colombia and other parts of South America. They can be made from plain wheat flour and can be topped with a variety of fillings. Most Colombians prefer cheese, but others like to add blackberry sauce, caramel, or jam.

Lechona

Stuffed roasted pig, or lechona, is one of Colombia’s traditional Christmas foods. While roasted pig is made year-round and often served in grocery stores, it is a favorite for the holidays. Many Colombians buy a pig, slaughter it, and prepare the meat for making lechona and Colombian sausages. This food is usually purchased from a reputable butcher in the country.

Snacks

What food do Colombians eat on the day after Christmas? The Colombian Christmas is a traditional celebration. It starts nine days before the day of Jesus’ birth, with ‘novenas de aguinaldo’. During these prayer-filled nights, Colombians recite a series of prayers and sing Christmas carols. The celebration culminates on Christmas Eve, the main day of celebration. The evening is spent eating delicious food and singing Christmas carols.

Desserts

What do Colombians eat on Christmas? Colombians celebrate the festive season with gusto. December is synonymous with eating, drinking, and dancing. The festive spirit extends beyond New Year’s Eve and into January for some. Here are some of the typical dishes enjoyed by Colombians. Listed below are some of the most popular Colombian Christmas foods. Aside from Christmas dinner, Colombians will celebrate the season with lots of festive drinks and food.

Holiday decorations

What do Colombians eat on Christmas? In Colombia, the celebration of Christmas is more about family and friends than anything else. Colombians will throw enormous parties and blow vallenato, and of course, they will eat a lot of food. Colombians are the epitome of festive season, so they are particularly excited about this time of year. Here are a few examples of what they usually eat and drink on Christmas Day.